Tag Archive: Tuvan throat singing


THE ORPHAN’S LAMENT, HUUN HUUR TU

In Tuvan folklore, the orphan is a key figure who shows the central impor­tance of love and family relationships. Deprived of parents, orphans are con­sidered the unluckiest of humans, even if they own lots of animals and have plenty of money.

THE ORPHAN’S LAMENT
I’m alone, I’m an orphan If I’d died as a baby.
If as a baby I’d died It wouldn’t have been such a misfor­tune
I’m alone, I’m an orphan
If I’d died as a newborn in the cradle
If as a newborn in the cradle I’d died
No one would have needed my thick­ened blood (placenta)
[i.e., it would have been better to have been aborted
than to have had such an unfortunate life]
We feel pity for a tiny bird
That tumbles from a broken nest
We feel pity for a baby
Who has lost his mother
The fate of the universe Can’t be held back
Even if my dying mother stood up and came to me
She wouldn’t add to my happiness

What is the history behind the developement of khöömei?

The phenomenon of Tuvan throat-singing, with its various styles of performance, continues to amaze people. The spiritual world of the Tuvans, like their lifestyle itself, consolidated and embodied the freedom-loving impulses of the steppe dwellers, the inhabitants of Inner Asia.

If one imagines how endless a steppe road is, how unhurried a Tuvan horse’s tread or pensive a camel’s step is, how far steppe roads and mountain paths stretch, then it will not be difficult to realize that the life of a Tuvan in the steppe is inconceivable without sygyt-khöömei, a symbol of the Tuvan steppe that is as quiet, measured, and interminable as life itself. It is not without reason that Tuvans puzzled ethnographers when they could not answer the question: “How old are you?” The matter was not that they were unable to count. This question itself made no sense to them because time per se was an abstract notion.

Nature created a striking acoustic effect in the mountains and steppes of Tuva, where every loud word echoes with deafening reiterations. Over time Tuvans learned how to extract from these sounds the incomparable melodies that are the hallmark of the Tuvan national singing tradition. This is why from time immemorial Tuvan throat singing has been the eternal companion of singers and storytellers.

A khöömeizhi was a welcome and honored guest in any yurt, who always gave his listeners the gift of his music, born in the heart and soul of his people. The melodies of khöömei accompanied the Tuvan people in all their joys and sorrows.

Khöömei Is a phenomenon close to the soul of the Tuvan people a means of expressing the Tuvan worldview, a symbol of Tuvan spirituality, and the key to the spirit of the Tuvan people. It is in khöömei that Tuvans found consolation in their hour of need ancient times khöömei has helped Tuvans persevere, overcome hardships with dignity, and preserve their humanity.

If a nation loses its own unique identity, it will disappear from the face of the earth. Current data make it abundantly clear that not only of researchers, but also members of the younger generation are trying to preserve the art of singing, as well as the customs, rituals, and traditions of the Tuvan people. By exploring and researching Tuvan throat singing, we are able to revive all genres of musical culture long songs (uzun yrlar), short songs (kiska yrlar), refrains and ditties (kozhamyktar), as well as instrumental works for such traditional instruments as igil, byzaanchi, doshpuluur, khomus (mouth harp), and other bowed, plucked, wind, and percussion instruments

Khöömei is an art that attracts the attention not only of connoisseurs of folk music, but also of all those who would like to learn about the history of the music and the spiritual world of the Tuvan people, and of their lyrical and ritual songs. Every ethnic group has contributed to the development of human civilization and global cultural heritage. Tuvans likewise have their own contribution of great value, which has been passed down for centuries from generation to generation, and that is khöömei. Locals have preserved in memory several techniques of this art, including khöömei, ezengilleer borbangnadyr kargyraa, and sygyt.

ZOYA KYRGYS

THE MYSTERY OF TUVAN KHÖÖMEI ( THROAT SINGING)

INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC CENTER “KHÖÖMEI” REPUBLIC OF TUVA

This publication is protected by the law of the Russian Federation ob avtorskom prave ( ” On copyright”) .

Paul Pena played blues with the greats T-Bone Walker, B.B. King, and Bonnie Raitt. In 1995, the blind bluesman became the first American ever to compete in an unusual contest of multi-harmonic “throatsinging.”

The Autonomous Republic of Tuva, wedged between Siberia and Mongolia, for centuries has been isolated from the rest of the world by jagged mountains and Soviet restrictions. Only recently have the Tuvan art form of throatsinging become known to outsiders.

Pena discovered Tuvan throatsinging on a shortwave program of Radio Moscow twelve years ago. Multiple voices emanated from a single vocalist and the sounds gripped him like nothing he had ever heard. For the next nine years he worked to produce similar overtones with his own voice and to incorporate throatsinging into his blues music.

Unexpectedly in 1993, Pena discovered that Tuvan throatsingers were on their first concert tour of the U.S.. After their performance, the deep-voiced bluesman broke into his own self-taught style of throatsinging and serenaded the musicians with Tuvan traditional songs! The throatsingers were amazed by Pena’s mastery of the Tuvan art form and likened his rich voice to the sounds of tremors in the earth. They insisted that “Chershemjer” (Earthquake) travel to Tuva for the next tri-ennial throatsinging contest which would be held in 1995.

Eleven years after he first heard throat singing, Paul Pena entered the National Theatre of Tuva to make history. The blind bluseman’s performance was so well received, he became the 1995 throatsinging champion in the style of kargyraa. He also captured the “audience favorite” award for the week-long competition. The Tuvan people had never seen or heard anyone like him.

Pena was honored by the Tuvan people, not only because he mastered kargyraa, but he also learned to speak their language. His friendship flourished with Kongar-ol Ondar, the throatsinging champion who had invited Pena three years earlier. Ondar hosted Pena as the bluesman experienced the country he once believed he would never visit.

“Genghis Blues” is a film about exploration and friendship. It is the story of a man whose struggle in life is not defined by conformity and rules but by an unquenchable curiosity, and love of music. Pena’s story is truly an inspiration to all.

www.genghisblues.com

Kongar-ol Ondar, performing at the 2013 Rose Parade, was respected by musicians worldwide.

Kongar-ol Ondar, performing at the 2013 Rose Parade, was respected by musicians worldwide.

Kongar-ol Ondar, an internationally renowned master of Tuvan throat singing, the Central Asian vocal art in which a singer produces two or more notes simultaneously — and which to the uninitiated sounds like the bewitching, remarkably harmonious marriage of a vacuum cleaner and a bumblebee — died on July 25 in Kyzyl, Tuva’s capital. He was 51.

The cause was complications after emergency surgery for a brain hemorrhage, said Sean P. Quirk, a longtime friend.

A region in southern Siberia just north of Mongolia, Tuva was an independent country from 1921 until 1944, when it was annexed by the Soviet Union. The region, which has a population of about 300,000, is now part of the Russian Federation.

Small, round and beatific, Mr. Ondar was a superstar in Tuva — “like John F. Kennedy, Elvis Presley and Michael Jordan kind of rolled into one,” in the words of “Genghis Blues” (1999), an Oscar-nominated documentary about throat singing in which he figures prominently.

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RADIK TYULYUSH- Singer, composer, Master Of Traditional Tuvan Throat Singing Member of Huun HuurTu

He plays İGİL at Festival in Switzerland and tells story of this traditional instrument.
The song calls Ak Taigam means White Taiga, folk words and music from Tuva.

“Open your arms to change but don’t let go of your values.”

~ Dalai Lama

Watercolor on paper-Radik Tyulyush-Tuvan Throat Singer

Watercolor on paper-Radik Tyulyush-Tuvan Throat Singer

“Music expresses that which cannot be said and on which it is impossible to be silent.”

~ Victor Hugo

watercolor on paper-radik tyulyush

watercolor on paper-radik tyulyush

Huun-Huur-Tu

Huun-Huur-Tu

Throat singing-Huun Huur Tu – Chiraa-Khoor.

Hey, what’s that sound: Throat singing
A droning, pulverising sound of shamanic origin, this is ancient soul music from the east
What is it? A catch-all term covering different disciplines of extreme vocal technique from around the world, often recognised as a low, pulverising, drone-growl that western ears sometimes interpret as “scary”. But the history behind the throat singing traditions of Inuit tribes and the people of Siberia has strong cultural significance, and the overlapping, oscillating vocal tones (several different notes are produced in the mouth of one singer simultaneously) can be transcendent and beautiful.
Who uses it?
How does it work?
Where does it come from?
Answers are here…
http://www.theguardian.com/music/2010/jun/02/throat-singing
Radik Tyulyush who is touching people with his art with his great songs!!!
You can listen here his new album “Chalama”…Enjoy it!! http://chalama.kroogi.com/?locale=en

http://innerasianmusic.com/sales.htm

Hey, what’s that sound: Throat singing
A droning, pulverising sound of shamanic origin, this is ancient soul music from the east
What is it? A catch-all term covering different disciplines of extreme vocal technique from around the world, often recognised as a low, pulverising, drone-growl that western ears sometimes interpret as “scary”. But the history behind the throat singing traditions of Inuit tribes and the people of Siberia has strong cultural significance, and the overlapping, oscillating vocal tones (several different notes are produced in the mouth of one singer simultaneously) can be transcendent and beautiful.
Who uses it?
How does it work?
Where does it come from?
Answers are here… Hey, what’s that sound?

Radik Tyulyush who is touching people soul with his art with his great songs!!!

You can listen here his new album “Chalama“…Enjoy it!!

Official orcherstra of the tuvan ministry of culture. The song is dedicated to Kul Tigin (Kül (Köl, Gül, Göl) Tigin (Tegin)[Prince Kul] Khan Bengü İnançu Apa Tarkan) 闕特勒 (685 – 731 or 732 CE) was a famous general of the Second Kaganate of “Kök Türük”. He was a second son of legendary Ilterish Shad (Kutlugh) and the younger brother of Bilge Kagan.

Deep throat … Tuvan singers Huun Huur Tu featuring Sainkho

Huun-Huur-Tu

Huun-Huur-Tu

Hey, what’s that sound: Throat singing

A droning, pulverising sound of shamanic origin, this is ancient soul music from the east

What is it? A catch-all term covering different disciplines of extreme vocal technique from around the world, often recognised as a low, pulverising, drone-growl that western ears sometimes interpret as “scary”. But the history behind the throat singing traditions of Inuit tribes and the people of Siberia has strong cultural significance, and the overlapping, oscillating vocal tones (several different notes are produced in the mouth of one singer simultaneously) can be transcendent and beautiful.

Who uses it?

How does it work?

Where does it come from?

Answers are here…

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2010/jun/02/throat-singing

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